How to Make Homemade Butter

How to make homemade butter in a stand mixer. I seriously cannot believe how easy this is! It costs less, tastes better, is fun to do with kids and it makes buttermilk too!

Okay, so maybe I just tend to get overly excited about butter in general, but I am pretty sure that making homemade butter in my Kitchen-Aid is both the coolest and the most domestic thing I’ve ever done.   Just when I didn’t think it was possible to love an appliance even more….I mean really, what’s better than homemade butter?   Mmmmmmmm…..butter……

But I digress.

It was seriously so easy that I see a lot more butter making in our future.  Since this was technically a homeschool activity (and had no selfish motivations whatsoever!), we tried to follow the instructions from Little House in the Big Woods as closely as we could.  Of course considering that we didn’t have a cow or a real butter churn, or even a wooden bowl and paddle, we did a lot of improvising.

We used a quart of heavy cream, which made approximately a pound of butter and about 2 and 1/2 cups of buttermilk.  I paid $5.99 for the cream at Publix, which was a lot, but next time I’d probably stock up at Sam’s Club, where it is just under $3 a quart.  I’ve heard Aldi has super cheap cream as well.  We also grated a carrot to add yellow coloring because that is the way Ma Ingalls did it, but next time I would probably skip that step!

Here is what you need:

1 carrot (optional)
1/4 c. milk (optional)
1 quart heavy cream
3/4 teaspoon salt

 

Step 1 (optional):  Peel & finely grate a carrot.  Heat in small saucepan with 1/4 cup milk until milk is bubbly.  Use a clean cheesecloth to strain orange-colored milk into the bowl of your stand mixer.  Discard shredded carrot.

Step 2:  Pour cream into bowl of stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment.  Add salt.  Cover mixer with a towel–trust me on this one, it will be messy!  Turn mixer on high.

How to Make Homemade Butter in a Stand Mixer Long

Step 3:  Continue mixing, checking on mixture frequently.  It will first turn to whipped cream, then begin to get grainy and separate into butter and buttermilk, and the splashing will get much worse.  The butter is ready when it sticks in a clump to the paddle.

Step 4:  Place a colander over a bowl, then strain the buttermilk off of the butter.  (For a GREAT recipe using buttermilk, try these super yummy refrigerator raisin bran muffins–they are our FAVORITE!)

 Step 5:  Using your hands or a spatula, press out excess buttermilk under cold running water until water runs clear.  Shape into stick or ball.  Butter will keep covered in refrigerator for up to 4 weeks.  Serve with bread and enjoy!

Note:  While we were making our main batch of butter in the Kitchen-Aid, we also made a very small amount of butter by placing the cream in a small jar and taking turns shaking it.  This was a great way to show the kids how much work it is to make butter by hand!  Our shaken butter didn’t turn out quite as firm, probably because we didn’t shake it long or hard enough–my 3 and 6 year old didn’t have a lot of stamina, but older kids would probably do a little better!

How to make homemade butter in a stand mixer. I seriously cannot believe how easy this is! It costs less, tastes better, is fun to do with kids and it makes buttermilk too!

*   *   *

Have you ever made homemade butter? Did you do it differently?  How did it turn out?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Pin It

Affiliate links may be used in this post. Printing a coupon or ordering a product through this link may result in a commission, which helps pay for the cost of running this site and keeps the content free. Read my full disclosure policy here.

{ 124 comments… add one }

  • Allison February 18,

    This is SO COOL! Cant WAIT to try it! Thanks Ruth!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • Denise February 18,

    I am adding heavy cream to my shopping list right now!

    Reply
  • Lisa February 18,

    This is really cool. I really wish I had a kitchenaid mixer to try it. (Maybe someday!) I’m curious about the shaking method that you used. Do you think it would work with a larger amount? How long did you shake it for?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup February 18,

      It would definitely work for a larger amount, you just need to be careful about using a glass jar with kids. We shook for maybe 20-25 minutes, but not continuously and not very vigorously. The girls got tired of shaking VERY quickly, but I think if you were doing it right it would turn out just as good as with the Kitchen Aid. Let me know if you try it!

      Reply
    • Amanda April 4,

      You do not need a kitchenaid. Any mixer would do including a hand mixer.

      Reply
      • Anonymous May 12,

        shhhhh! I am trying to get my husband to get me a kitchenaid so I can make all these delicious recioes! SHHH! You most certainly do need a Kitchenaid!

        Reply
    • shayne allen November 29,

      just did it for the ist time..sao simple and only took like 5 to 10 min switching arms ..i added bout3\4 tsp salt..wifeand kids all prefer it..we did a tast test

      Reply
    • Anonymous January 7,

      Shaking works just as well just a lot more work.

      Reply
    • Elizabeth Smith May 16,

      I use my food processor with the metal blade. I get much more buttermilk,and have less smoohing to do. Good quality cream yields better butter but even so-so cream makes much better butter than the stuff you buy at the store. Do not waste the buttermilk! It acts like natural preservative for baked goods from bread to cookies. It does NOT taste like store bought buttermilk. It is sweet and delicious!

      Reply
  • Momsee February 18,

    Where does the buttermilk come into play? I didn’t see it in the recipe anywhere?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup February 18,

      The buttermilk is created at the end when the butter separates from the buttermilk. The butter will form a big lump in a pool of milk. Step 5 is to place a colander over a bowl to strain the butter from the buttermilk–the bowl will catch the milk! Hope that makes sense–let me know if it doesn’t! :-)

      Reply
      • Momsee February 21,

        Thanks. I was thinking that you needed the buttermilk to make the butter.. got it now.. Thanks!

        Reply
        • Debi April 26,

          buttermilk is the product that you end up with after shaking the cream. Butter and the milk it leaves behind (buttermilk)

          Reply
          • Lisa March 1,

            This is traditional buttermilk. But very different from the buttermilk you buy in the store, cultured buttermilk, and very different from the buttermilk of old. Milk and cream are mechanically seperated now, but they used to let it sit to separate, in which time bacteria fermented it. Using this in place of buttermilk in a modern recipe may produce less than desirable results.

            Reply
            • Sara March 24,

              Can this buttermilk be used at all in any recipes?

              Reply
              • Ruth Soukup March 24,

                I use it in place of regular buttermilk in recipes & haven’t had any problems. :-)

                Reply
  • Carol February 18,

    I don’t have a stand alone mixer, but I do have a big food processor.. wonder if it would work too, what do you think?

    Reply
    • Bunny July 28,

      Yes, you can use a food processor. I make small batches of herbed butter from my freshly grown herbs. Three to six differently flavored butters on a beautiful serving dish with a thinly sliced and toasted (on a cookie sheet) baguette makes an attractive and simple presentation. James Beard loved non-herbed sweet butter (do not add salt) on radish slices. Yummy contrast of soft and creamy butter on crunchy and tangy radishes. I do not add carrot or salt to my butter…soft white color looks more natural to me. You might want to present the dish with a few buttered radishes so your guests “get it”. Let me knowing you try this and like it! As our Julia says….Bon Appetit!

      Reply
  • Anje February 18,

    You can also make butter by putting the milk/cream in a bottle and shake it for 10-15 minutes. Very popular for children and no need for equipment. (You may need to knead a little salt in at the end.) Remember doing this at school. :)

    Reply
    • Anonymous October 17,

      also an easy way to make buttermilk is to just add lemon juice to your milk set aside for about 15 minutes. try it . it works.

      Reply
      • sharon March 29,

        I use vinegar instead of lemon juice. But, it works great!!

        Reply
  • Jess February 18,

    Will be trying this as soon as I get my Kitchenaid! Thanks for the great idea Ruth!

    Reply
  • Kristi February 18,

    I remember doing the “shake the jar” method with my mom when I was a kid! Thanks for bringing back a happy childhood memory!

    Reply
  • Claire @ A Little Claireification February 19,

    OMGosh you are my hero. Girl, this is crazy awesome! I love it.
    xo, Claire
    (PS: For me, Target always has the cheapest Heavy Cream – it’s usually $3.99 for an Archer Farms quart (Winn Dixie is always $7-8 bucks – nuts. And I know this because, even though we shop Publix, when I am missing Heavy Cream (often), WD is only a few blocks away) so whenever I am in Target I now just buy two). :)

    Reply
  • Gillian February 19,

    Yummy butter!
    The Kitchenaid is awesome – lots less work!
    When I did this with my homeschooled daughter who is now 20, I put in a couple of clean marbles with the cream in the jar – it accelerates the process (although the process is louder too) … works like a charm! :)

    Reply
  • Wanda Tyndall February 21,

    We made homemade buttermilk when i was a child growing up on the farm! Now this is awesome, I can make it without the cow!!! thanks so much for sharing this with us, you Rock!

    Reply
  • Dennie February 25,

    Please If I may ask, what does the carrot have to do with anything????Next trip to the grocey store I’m going to start making my own butter! Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
    • Djay March 3,

      the grated carrot makes it yellow. 1/4 cup milk heated with grated carrot in it then strain w cheesecloth into kitchenaid add heavy cream to bowl and beat.

      Reply
    • Cate July 16,

      The carrot is unnecessary – however, so many people are used to butter being yellow. If you don’t use the carrot, the butter will be white……..just as tasty, just not colored.

      Reply
      • csue August 8,

        If you get your cream from cows that are grass fed the cream is yellow. Cows that don’t graze and pasture on green grass make white butter. It is still yummy just not as nutritionally dense.

        Reply
  • Carla March 3,

    Can you freeze this butter if you make alot, or just refridgerate? Love the idea of making my own butter.

    Reply
    • Carol Jackson February 4,

      Daughter makes this alot and she freezes. Used some to make a cobbler for her birthday and it was yummy. She shapes into 1pound logs and freezes.

      Reply
      • Morticia July 20,

        Thank you, I was going to ask if this can be frozen. Yay!

        Reply
  • Linda April 22,

    Hi Ruth,
    I have always wanted to learn how to make my own butter…this is something that sounds easy enough but I don’t think the carrot is necessary..lol.

    Thanks for sharing the recipe and by the way – found it on Pinterest :)

    Linda

    Reply
  • tlw May 24,

    Many years ago, when I was a little girl, my momma used whole cows milk that she would put inside a glass gallon jug. She would sit on the front porch with the jub laid down in her lap, towards her knees..She would rock the jug up and down from end to end til the butter was made. She then rinsed the milk out of the butter, press the water out, then add a little salt..That was the best tasting homemade butter I ever tasted. We then used the buttermilk for making biscuits and cornbread..The butter was so good in chocolate gravy and on her breads and homemade loaves of bread..I miss it still today…tlw.

    Reply
  • Heather June 13,

    This is way cool! Have you ever tried baking with this butter?

    Reply
    • Anonymous February 4,

      It is just the same as processed butter and so can be used in any recipe calling for butter.

      Reply
  • Penny June 19,

    Thanks for sharing the fun story:-) a hand whisk or egg beater will work well if you don’t have a mixer. Just a thought, I never add salt and it is really yummy.

    Reply
  • Dessi July 1,

    Hi, do you think I could use cow’s milk to do this? Like fresh from the cow?
    Thanks … and pinning this! :)

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup July 1,

      You could use fresh cow’s milk if you let it sit and skimmed the heavy cream off the top. :-)

      Reply
  • Colby July 24,

    Seriously, I have always been one of those dieting obsession mistakes that
    people make is to cut something completely out
    of their diet!

    Reply
  • Gigi July 25,

    That was too much fun and the butter taste wonderful! You were right about the splashing, it did indeed get much worse, but thanks to your suggestion on using the towels to cover the mixer it wasn’t too bad. Not sure I will do this again but I had always wanted to try it, so thanks for the helpful info!

    Reply
  • Miriam Miller July 26,

    I would love to know where you got that crater (used for the carrot).!!!

    Reply
    • Heidi July 30,

      I have the same one and got it at Ikea :)

      Reply
  • Heidi July 30,

    Would this be considered “clean” butter for “clean” eating?

    Reply
    • D.Soz May 29,

      Absolutely not. I’m glad someone asked this. I like this idea but cheap dairy from Aldi is not “living well.” Pasteurized, homogenized, grain-fed, CAFO milk is terrible for you. The reason one would need to add coloring is because the cows are not grass fed wbich is their normal diet. It is also why it is filled with pus, devoid of the naturally occurring fat soluble vitamins (A, D, K), and contains a very disproportionate number 9f fatty acids. If you want to do something good for your family with regards to butter you need to source real cream or buy Kerry Gold, Strauss, Organic Valley, or the like. I’m all for making my own butter but not if it’s at the expense of my health using conventional commercial dairy.

      Reply
      • Angela July 26,

        Why not just use raw milk from grass fed cows? Would it then qualify as clean?

        Reply
  • Erin July 31,

    Can I use just whole milk? I have heavy cream but I have a bunch of whole milk I need to use.

    Reply
    • Anonymous September 4,

      No, whole milk doesn’t contain enough fat. Use the whole milk for rice pudding.

      Reply
    • Christina Maiville February 7,

      you can also use the whole milk for making mozzarella cheese.

      Reply
  • Anonymous August 4,

    I use my Cuisinart. No splashing and it is done for you in minutes! When you see it splashing around and looks watery inside, it’s done!

    Reply
  • Chelsea G. August 7,

    Did any who tried this try baking or cooking with this butter? Did it turn out well?

    Reply
    • Anonymous January 7,

      It’s just like any butter you buy…it’s called sweet cream butter when yoy don’t add in any salt

      Reply
  • Harold August 8,

    I use to help my mom make butter when I was a boy growing up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. We had a Guernsey milk cow and boy did she produce lots of milk and that milk produced lots of cream. Jersey & Guernsey cows are the only cows that produce lots of cream from their milk. I grew up on a farm. My mother had a (4) gallon churn that she made butter with. Fresh buttermilk is hard to come by unless you make your own.
    Real cows milk cream makes it’s own color and you don’t need salt either unless you just like salt.

    Reply
    • Anonymous June 24,

      Harold, I also grew up in the country and my mom used a churn. We let the milk sit out until it clabbered then churned and separated the butter from the buttermilk . No added color and salt was sparingly added at the end. Nothing better on hot biscuits or cornbread.

      Reply
      • Harold June 25,

        Your right’ nothing better than homemade butter on hot biscuits and hot cornbread and….homemade molasses & butter for dessert.

        Reply
  • Shelly August 12,

    Just wanted to say, thanks, for having a print option for your recipes. Not everyone does!

    Reply
  • Cherilynne Churchill August 15,

    This is much easier and less messy if you do it in the blender.

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup August 17,

      Thanks for the tip Cherilynne! We don’t currently own a blender but after reading other comments I think I may try the food processor next time! Good to know it works in the blender as well. Do you have to do a small amount?

      Reply
  • Anonymous August 17,

    Thank you it will save me alot of money

    Reply
  • Tricia Sheeran September 7,

    Just a suggestion: Since you already have cheese cloth use it to squeeze the excess moisture out of your butter instead of running the water over it or using the colander. That way you end up with more buttermilk too. FYI, it is not the same as cultured buttermilk you buy at the store! Oh, and you don’t have to put the mixer on High—or even use a mixer. We used to make butter in kindergarten by putting the cream in a jar and shaking it. Of course this worked best when you had 20 kids taking turns shaking it, but (IMO) we felt more like we accomplished something than we might if we just turned a mixer on an watched.

    Also, since you have the cheese cloth…..look into making your own Mozzarella! It’s super simple and you can add herbs or whatever to your cheese too!

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup September 9,

      Great tip! Thanks Tricia!

      Reply
  • Anonymous September 16,

    I didn’t see it answered so sorry if I just missed it. How well does it work for cooking and baking?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup September 20,

      It works great–same as “regular” store bought butter!

      Reply
  • Sar September 20,

    Pull your girls hair back when cooking in the kitchen….they did many years ago as well as I’m sure your grandmother would agree!!!

    Reply
    • bakerette October 23,

      Or you could not post something like that. Rude.

      Reply
      • Anonymous January 12,

        It is a safety thing. Not only does it keep it from falling in the prep, it keeps it from accidentally getting caught in the equipment.

        Reply
        • Sharon July 23,

          Well said, Anonymous.

          Reply
  • Valerie September 28,

    What do you do with the carrot milk?

    Reply
    • Anonymous April 12,

      Drink it!

      Reply
  • Kathy October 11,

    Thanks for this! I absolutely loved the “Little House” books when I was a little girl (a million years ago!) Congratulations on doing a wonderful job home schooling your kids!

    Reply
  • Anita October 14,

    I don’t have a stand mixer but have made butter by shaking it in a jar several times. We used raw cream, though, so I have never tried it from store bought cream. I found it went a lot faster if the cream was at least room temp. Also, with the raw cream it was yellow naturally. I’m sure it probably tastes better with store bought cream than with raw cream. I just haven’t acquired a taste for raw milk, but take it when it is available.

    Reply
  • Tammy October 24,

    I made this with a stand mixer and store bought ultra pasteurized heavy cream, NO milk or carrot. Results were GREAT!

    1) It was as yellow, if not at least a little yellower than store bought butter, though I am sure that fresher, grass fed cows’ cream will produce a better tasting and better quality butter.

    2) I read a post somewhere that it will not work with ultra pasteurized cream… not true! Perhaps by hand it will be more difficult/time consuming, but in the stand mixer it did fine. Honestly, most of us have made butter once or twice accidentally while making whipped cream and taking it too far.

    While I see the value in using the jars, also consider the value of the stand mixer – as a cooking lesson. Students can watch the ‘phases’ of turning cream into a foam/froth, soft peaks, stiff peaks and then butter.

    Reply
  • mechele October 28,

    Thanks for posting this! Will def try. Wish I had the recipe qhen I homeschooled.

    Reply
  • Lashonda October 29,

    This sounds like an awesome idea and I’m super exited to make it. How long is the butter good for? (This seems like a lot of butter to make at once, I was just wondering if it goes bad more quickly than the store both version)

    Reply
    • rw January 7,

      I used to make all my own butter. I learned years ago that it will eventually sour if you don’t get all the milk out of the butter. It’s still good for baking, but not so great on toast or bread.

      Reply
  • Antoinette November 10,

    Can I bake with this homemade butter?

    Reply
    • Anonymous January 12,

      Yes, just remember to adjust the salt in your recipe because you added salt to the butter. Or leave the salt out when making it and use according to recipe directions. To store put wax paper in your measuring cups ( 1/4, 1/2,…) (divide the 1/4 cup into 4th’s to get your Tbsp) pack it and refrigerate or freeze ( wrap in aluminum foil to store for few months Vacuum seal it to store for a year).

      Reply
  • Karen Goodman November 26,

    I can guarantee that I will never make homemade butter…but reading your instructions was quite fascinating. Good for you for creating such a fun home schooling experience to show kids where our food really comes from.

    Reply
  • Laurie December 20,

    We did this with my daughters kinder class back in 2011 for part of their Thanksgiving celebration. =) Many tired arms from all the shaking. They made this and whipped cream. Its a tradition that we continue to this day for the holidays. Although now we use our kitchen aid. My almost 18 year old always mumbles cheaters under her breath when they start making it. She has her “Back in my day we did this with a jar and our arms” story she goes through every year. It gets us all laughing and saying, “Yes Granny we know, we know.” =)

    Reply
  • Anonymous December 22,

    Of course you can bake with this butter. However, it would be more difficult to appreciate the fruits of your efforts as opposed to using on bread.

    Reply
    • Sri March 29,

      Hi Crumb Boss,It’s Caroline from Australia again Just wanted to say thknas for the good work and great recipes! I just tried out your red velvet cake recipe over the weekend, I’ve never tried or even heard of red velvet before watching your video, and I must say, the cake tastes amazing!!I’m not a big fan of chocolate cakes (I’m weird, I know..) but in this cake, the cocoa powder and all the other ingredients mix together with the cream cheese icing to create a very unique tasting cake that is simply delicious! And it was so easy to make!Thanks again for this great recipe and keep up the good work! I love you and the producer!P.S. If I can’t find buttermilk, is there anything else that I could use as a substitute? Or the recipe just won’t work without buttermilk?

      Reply
  • Anonymous January 5,

    I make butter just about every week! Growing up we made all of the butter we needed. I remember as a young girl having to go to my grandma to churn the butter for her! Now I use my Cuisinart stand mixer. This butter is the best butter to use for baking! We get raw milk from a local farmer every week and I scoop the cream off the milk the following day. Make sure the cream is well chilled. I use the milk to make my own cottage cheese every week!

    Reply
    • Anonymous January 7,

      Ok now I’m curious how do you make cottage cheese? Definitely going to try making butter!! Thank you for the post.

      Reply
  • Marlene January 5,

    I made the butter today using my mixer,I also did the carrot for color . The butter turned out very good. The mixer time was about 15 minutes. I may try the food processor next time. January 5, 2014

    Reply
  • Anonymous January 8,

    Can you freeze the butter?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup January 9,

      Yes. :-)

      Reply
  • Anonymous January 8,

    You can get the same result using a handheld mixer, I have accidentally made butter a couple times while making whipped cream.

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup January 9,

      Good to know! :-)

      Reply
  • JoDee January 9,

    When I homeschooled my girls, one year we did the Little House on the Prairie Ciriculum. All I can say is that it was awesome and fun for all of us! We did the butter and many other things. I miss it!

    Reply
  • Taneasha @ Authors Kitchen January 22,

    I’ve been thinking about making homemade butter for a while now. After seeing how easy it was to do with the stand mixer, I just might.

    Just as a heads up, though, the buttermilk that comes off of the butter is not like commercial buttermilk you buy from the store. Store bought buttermilk is basically just low fat milk that has had cultures added to it. The result is that it becomes acidic. The acid not only gives it its tangy flavor, but it also makes it react differently in recipes. If you want to use this fresh buttermilk in recipes that call for buttermilk, you’ll need to add a little bit of vinegar to it.

    Reply
    • Anonymous April 12,

      Good advice, because buttermilk has to be a little tangy, it’s what makes it yummy!

      Reply
  • Linda January 25,

    When making butter, Do you use regular ultra pasteurized whipping cream or does it have to be just pasteurized ?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup January 27,

      Hi Linda,
      Using pasteurized Heavy Cream is fine.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  • Tarra February 4,

    I would like to make my own butter but any heavy cream I have ever found has a whole lot of “other” stuff in it other than milk/cream.

    Reply
  • Carol Jackson February 4,

    Got a Hamilton Beach stand mixer for Christmas and Have the Nija system. Thank You for the Sam’s pricing. Will be checking that out. Daughter makes and I wanted to do that as well, but concerned about the cost effective value – can’t wait to go to Sam’s.

    Reply
  • Ann February 9,

    Thanks for this but why use shredded carrot? My friend makes homemade butter with cream only and it looks rather a pale yellow compared to yours which looks a bit brighter. Pardon me if I sound ignorant but I don’t know much about cooking…

    Reply
  • leia February 17,

    What is the carrot for?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup February 17,

      The shredded carrot provides the yellow coloring to the milk (step 1) but this is an optional step.

      Reply
  • Judy February 22,

    What temperature is the milk when you are making the butter?

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup February 23,

      When the milk reaches a low boil and is “bubbly”.

      Reply
  • Anonymous February 28,

    Went to the store today. The cream was $5.89 and a pound of butter was $3.29. I bought the butter. I realize you never claimed it was cheaper, just fun. Maybe I’ll do it someday when my kids are older and will think its neat.

    Reply
  • Sam @ My Carolina Kitchen March 14,

    I saw Jacques Pepin make this on Rachael Ray’s show and he used cream in a food processor. So cool. I can’t wait to try your version.
    Sam

    Reply
  • Alison March 14,

    The one question I haven’t seen asked is: Do you skip heating the milk if you choose to omit the carrot? Or does it have to be at the bubbling point regardless? I couldn’t tell if you skip the entire first part and just start whipping the milk and cream cold.

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup March 15,

      If not using the carrot you can skip step 1 and move on to step 2. I hope this helps!
      Enjoy!

      Reply
  • Victoria March 15,

    This is a bit off topic…really like your grater bowl. Please tell me where to get one.

    Reply
  • Anonymous March 15,

    we used to live in a very remote area and would buy the cream when it was reduced as the store would never fly it back for trade ins. As for the mess..i just put everything away and let her fly…most fun my daughters and I would have all month!

    Reply
  • Doris K. Eckel April 12,

    Well, growing up in Germany a long time ago, I learned to make butter in the wooden urn with a wooden stick. I got a turn to help at our next door neighbors farm house, it was fun to try that, but hard work and time consuming! That was normal in those days. In school we were “modern” and used a standmixer. Well, the day we wanted to make whipcream for a recipe, it ended up becoming butter, so, I was elected to walk to the milk store, probably at least 2 miles roundtrip, to get more cream, to make that darn whipcream. We all watched like hawks, that the same would not happen again this time. It didn’t!!!! But for old time sake I wouldlike to try making butter from scratch in the blender I think. I’ll report how it went, maybe!

    Reply
  • Doris K. Eckel April 12,

    hat happened to my comment? It didn’t get printed!

    Reply
    • Anonymous April 12,

      What was wrong with it?

      Reply
    • Ruth Soukup April 13,

      Every so often, for a reason I haven’t been able to figure out, all my comments will go into moderation and have to be manually approved. It will happen for a day or so, and then I will approve them all and the site will go back to normal. Sorry about that! Gotta love technology! :-)

      Reply
    • Doris K. Eckel April 13,

      Thank you for responding to my question and thanks for printing my comment!

      Reply
  • Ouida Gabriel April 12,

    Could you share how much butter resulted for the recipe? I saw that someone commented earlier that butter was cheaper per pound but I never saw if or where you posted a amount that was the result. If it was even a little savings then I would try this. With 6 children, we could knock it out without any energy use! Thanks for sharing this recipe.

    Ouida Gabriel

    Reply
  • Sandy April 15,

    I make butter all the time. I use room temperature heavy cream. Pasteurized or ultra pasteurized is fine. I use an old fashioned butter churn with a glass jar and paddle, I also do it with my grandson with a store bought shaking device. We enjoy adding herbs, or garlic, or honey to the butter after it is rinsed. YUM!!! So far it has always been store bought heavy cream, but ,I really want to talk to one of my local farmers and buy some corn fed sweet heavy cream straight from the cow. II am really glad I am not alone in my butter making enjoyment. Oh, and it never takes more than about ten minutes when using room temp. cream.

    Reply
  • Terry May 14,

    Hi Ruth,
    About how much buttermilk will this give me? It doesn’t seem like I’d get enough to use in a recipe.

    Reply
  • cindy May 15,

    I make it in the blender, no mess.

    Reply
  • Christian Louboutin Outlet June 18,

    I’ve been browsing online more than 2 hours today, yet
    I never found any interesting article like yours. It’s
    pretty worth enough for me. Personally, if all site owners and bloggers made good content
    as you did, the net will be a lot more useful than ever before.

    Reply
  • Steph July 1,

    At the risk of sounding dense, I am with you up to running water over it. Wouldn’t that water down buttermilk? Am I misunderstanding that part? Thanks :)

    Reply
  • Ruth A Stiles July 1,

    I made homemade butter by hand in a jar in 11th grade when we had to create something without any modern help. I decided to make bread by hand as well as butter to go with it. It took me forever. But thankfully it was winter and I could use the woodstove! it would be hard to make bread without a heat source!

    Reply
  • Katie August 1,

    Do you know about how much buttermilk you get out of this process?? Thanks!!

    Reply
    • Ruth Soukup August 2,

      About 3 1/2 cups. :-)

      Reply
  • donna murphy August 17,

    Aldi has butter for $2.69 . Heavy whipping cream at cub is $3.69 and heavy cream at aldi is only $179. For a pint however there is cheaper butter at $1.79 your getting 2 for 1. Cuz your also getting the buttermilk. And its kinda nice to tell people you made your own butter.

    Reply
  • windows 7 crack how to download kick ass torrents September 20,

    Microsoft 70-680 exam questions and answers, study guides
    and practice test can be a big help in acquiring the core technical knowledge
    and skills needed for a successful certification experience.
    Make sure to uncheck the Mc – Affe Security suite option when installing Adobe Products.
    Typically, the last software package installed that is able to run a particular media file will control that file type each
    time it is opened.

    Reply

Leave a Comment